Weekly Photo Challenge – Boundaries

San Geronimo Church and Courtyard

San Geronimo Church and Courtyard

Boundaries separate and define spaces, relationships, countries. Here’s a view of the San Geronimo Church in the Taos Pueblo in Taos, New Mexico. The courtyard acts as a boundary between the secular and the sacred.

To learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here. 

16 comments on “Weekly Photo Challenge – Boundaries

  1. Carrie Rubin says:

    Perfect photo choice for this challenge. I like the contrast of colors too. The white against the brown.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cathy Ulrich says:

      Thanks so much, Carrie! So many of the buildings in the Taos Pueblo are the color of the clay, it feels as if these adobe structures have sprung from the ground, so this partially painted church really stands out there. I really like it too. It makes quite a statement!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Amy Reese says:

    Beautiful photo, Cathy. Great composition. I like the entrance way in the corner at the foot of the picture.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Gorgeous! Love the earthy colors!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. bikerchick57 says:

    Wonderful photo, Cathy. I would love to visit that church, looks very interesting and welcoming.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Amy says:

    Beautiful photo, the composition and colors are just perfect. …between the secular and the sacred, great post for the theme. Thank you for sharing, Cathy! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Those buildings look so delicious, Cathy, I want to take a bite out of them. I guess that could be called violating a boundary.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. seabluelee says:

    This type of architecture fascinates me. Your composition really shows off the shapes, the light and shadows. Love it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cathy Ulrich says:

      I agree about the architecture, Leon. I love the adobe structures in New Mexico. They have this wonderful organic feel to them. And there are many structures that are 300 years old! The walls are very thick – like two feet thick – so they keep the cool in during the summer and the heat in during the winter. It was a brilliant way to provide warmth and safety from the elements.

      Like

  8. I couldn’t leave a comment on your page… no send link?? The box is there, but then you can’t send the comment… or I couldn’t. Tried several times. Anyway, this is what I typed: Powerful images in contrast and metaphor. Hope your trip is fabulous, Cathy! Looking forward to some seascapes soon! 😉

    Safe travels, friend! Dawn >

    Like

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