Weekly Photo Challenge – Partners

Four Eyes Butterfly Fish

Four Eyes Butterfly Fish

Always in pairs, Butterfly fish flit around the reef feeding on coral polyps. Observing their behavior, it’s easy to see where they get their name. I love seeing these little guys, and in the Caribbean one can find several different species.

I’ve been trying for years to get a great shot of a pair of them as they’re always swimming together, but they move so fast, it’s really tough to get them in the same frame. While I did get both of them in the frame here, I’m still trying to get a great shot…maybe when we go to Belize later this year.

To learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Weekly Photo Challenge – Curve

Fluorescent Brain Coral

Fluorescent Brain Coral

I have been reading about fluorescence on the coral reefs for some time, so during our recent trip to Roatan, Honduras, I decided to try my hand at photographing it. Many life forms on the reefs fluoresce, but almost all corals do. To be able to see the fluorescence, one needs a blue light to excite it and then a yellow filter to cancel out the blue light to be able to see the true color of the fluorescence. And to photograph it, one also needs a blue filter for the strobe and a yellow filter for the camera.

So…I went equipped. Peter and I took yellow filters to go over our masks and I brought along a blue “Night Sea” LED light on a night dive. When we got to the coral reefs, it was like being on a ride in Disney World! Everything glowed in greens, oranges and even some pinks. On that night dive, I did not take the camera – as there’s just too much going on, but I did return the next day with filters on the strobe and camera.

This shot was taken during daylight hours, but the fluorescence in this brain coral was highly visible and photographable. What I love about this particular coral is that the “valleys” fluoresce, but the “hills” don’t. For comparison, here’s another shot of that same brain coral without the fluorescent lights and filters. Who would have guessed?

Christmas Tree Worms

Christmas Tree Worms

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Pure

Juvenile Drum Fish

Juvenile Drum Fish

Pure delight. Pure beauty. Pure innocence. This little juvenile drum fish is one of those symbols of young life on the reef. They’re fairly rare, spend most of their time flitting around in small confined places under overhangs on the reef, and they live in these small confined places because it’s relatively safe there for young fish.

Juvenile drums are relatively hard to photograph because they are always moving – quickly – so it was pure delight for me to be able to capture a shot of this little one during our trip to Roatan, Honduras this past week.

To learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Weekly Photo Challenge – Earth

White Rose

White Rose

Haha! I bet you thought I was going to post an underwater shot, didn’t you? Not today!

I love the beauty of our planet and here’s another shot that I’ll be displaying at my first show of the season in two weeks. It’s really quite dramatic printed on metal!

To learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Weekly Photo Challenge – Admiration

Sunny Face

Sunny Face

I admire nature in all of her glory. Flowers never cease to amaze me in their complexity and colors. I’m working on a new series of flowers for the upcoming art show season and this sunflower is a piece I shot just last week. She will be printed on metal and available for purchase at my first show – The French Nest Market in Fort Collins, Colorado on May 21st.

To learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Weekly Photo Challenge – Abstract

Elephant Ear Coral

Elephant Ear Coral

There are so many wonderful abstract surfaces on coral reefs. The coral creatures arrange themselves in colonies of swirls, nodules and sometimes they even look like the human brain. They’re usually named for the shapes that they seem to represent.

When I scuba dive, I’m often found perched over a coral head attempting to photograph some small, beautiful invertebrate, but sometimes when I can’t find one, I’ll focus my lens on the coral instead.

Elephant ear coral is mostly found clinging to the sides of shear underwater walls and underneath shelves in the reef and many are quite large. These specimens spanned several feet.

To learn more about the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Carrie Rubin’s Novel EATING BULL and My Personal Food Connection

I just finished reading “Eating Bull” and I found it intriguing. Carrie Rubin does a fantastic job of capturing many of the complex issues around obesity all wrapped into a captivating thriller.

I loved Amy’s review and agree wholeheartedly so I’m reblogging here. Have a great week!

The Bumble Files

EatingBullCover

I know I’ve read a great book when I’m still thinking about it months after I’ve turned the final pages. Carrie Rubin’s Eating Bull is one of those books. It is a tightly crafted thriller, told from the point of view of three characters: Jeremy, an overweight, bullied teen whose favorite friend is food; Sue, the pubic health nurse on a mission to sue to food industry for their reckless manipulation of consumers; and, finally, Darwin, the mystery serial killer who is targeting the obese. It’s a mix of mystery whodunit, horror story, and public health crisis all rolled into one.

Many of the characters are suffering some past emotional trauma which is pulled into their eating habits. This backdrop makes these characters seem all the more human and vulnerable. I thought Carrie did a masterful job of telling a horrific story, alongside the complexities of food.

While eating…

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