More Bumper Sticker Philosophy

The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift. – Albert Einstein.

I have long forgotten where I first heard this phrase and then one day, I saw it on a bumper sticker:

O.K. – Think about it – how many times have you thought something, especially about yourself that you fully and completely bought into? Most of our self-blame, self-deprecating, self-criticizing thoughts came from somewhere. They’re either old tapes from childhood, parents, peers, teachers, who probably meant well – at least on some level. Or, they’re thoughts that you cooked up all by yourself, building on criticisms that you heard along the way.

And what about when your mind slips into judgement about something or someone else? The mind seems to constantly want to label, compare, contrast as a way of controlling and making sense of life. But when that propensity to judge kicks in, we’re often left with either a sense of self-righteousness or some icky feeling that then feeds on our love of self-blame. What better way to validate that you’re a shit if you think bad thoughts about someone?

I think Einstein was right. We honor the rational mind too much. Not only do we honor it, we believe it! Think of all the suffering that could be avoided if we simply told our rational mind to mind its own business.

Here are a few suggestions to help you connect more fully with the intuitive mind and tell that pesky rational mind to take a hike!

  • Become the objective observer. When something is too close, we can’t see all of its dimensions. By mentally stepping back and looking at the situation, we can be more conscious and objective. Then we make better choices.
  • Become more familiar with the vibration of the intuitive mind. Some of the qualities of the intuitive mind (LargeSelf, Higher Self) are kindness, love, objectivity, and a bigger picture. It’s that feeling that says: “I don’t see me (them) as bad or scary.”
  • Remember to be in your body. When you find yourself believing thoughts that feel icky,  stop, breathe, come into the present moment. From that place, you can slow down the mental chatter and take back your power.
  • Have a conversation with yourself. Yes, it’s okay to do that – we all do. When a negative thought comes blasting in, you can say: “Interesting point of view. Thank you very much. I’ll consider it, but for right now I’m going to do something else.”
  • As you practice all of the above, notice how your thought patterns begin to shift. Over time, you’ll realize that you have replaced scary, negative thoughts with more loving, kind thoughts. After all, believing everything you think is just a habit. Once you start to changing that habit, you’ll be able to build on it.

So remember, your rational mind is a great tool. But it is just that – a tool. And sometimes it can be a tool (grin)!  Use it to do math problems, read, learn information. But don’t believe it. Because it wants you to give it your power. Just say no…

Love,

Cathy

©CathyUlrich and LargeSelf, 2012